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  • Opinion: The Qilinto Massacre: the truth shall be revealed

    On Saturday, September 3rd 2016, something sinister, ghastly, premeditated and honestly speaking somewhat poorly calculated, transpired in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Abeba. The tragedy in question has, for the most part, managed to avoid the sort of outcry and global condemnation these incidents tend to get when the actors involved are from nations not allied with the United States and its NATO affiliates in their “war on terror.” It has been more than two weeks, and already we are faced with subliminal calls from the conceited to pretend it didn’t happen.

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  • Growing Protests Bring Ethiopia to the Tipping Point - Sept. 2016

    The past weeks have seen an escalation of ongoing protests across Ethiopia—including widespread acts of resistance like citizens shaving their heads in solidarity with jailed opposition leader Bekele Gerba and stay-at-home protests that have turned bustling cities into near ghost-towns. Despite the undeniable peacefulness of these actions, state violence and repression has continued. Earlier this month, Ethiopia’s Prime Minister authorized the National Defence Force to use “its full force to bring rule of law” in the country. Internet shut downs by the government have been used to silence critics. And,  Addis Standard reported, security forces have broken into the homes of those who are “staying in.”

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  • Ethiopian Kiwis welcome support of New Zealand parliament

    For immediate release 8 September, 2016

    Ethiopian Kiwis welcome support of New Zealand parliament

    Ethiopian origin New Zealanders welcome a motion read in Parliament today that challenges the Ethiopian governments killing of civilians.

    One hundred Ethiopian kiwis and supporters marched from Civic Square to Parliament to deliver the message of support for justice and human rights.

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  • The ‘Ethiopian Spring’: “Killing is not an answer to our grievances”

    The Ethiopian leadership remains in denial. The long meetings of its ruling bodies have culminated in a report on 15 years of national “rebirth”, in which it awards itself good marks, while acknowledging the existence of a few problems here and there.

    Nonetheless, the odd warning signal may be heard – though very seldom – in counterpoint to the general complacency. Hailemariam Desalegn, prime minister and chairman of what is essentially the single party, has gone so far as to warn that the issues facing the regime are a matter of “life or death”,[1] and that Ethiopia is “sliding towards ethnic conflict similar to that in neighbouring countries”.[2]

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  • EPRDF and the West: A game of bullying and appeasement by Reprieve International

    The article posted by Reprieve International, a registered charity in the UK, has somehow revealed the kind of challenges and the level of influence that EPRDF holds against the UK. The consistent refusal of the Ethiopian Government to give consular access and fair trial for Andargachew Tsegie, a 62 year old Briton, prominent critic of the Ethiopian regime, who was detained unlawfully in 2014 while transiting through Yemen, has caused uproars in the UK and among Ethiopian diaspora.

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  • 6 Ways to Build Confidence that will Make You Truly Unstoppable

    There is one common trait among highly successful people that is universal no matter what it is that they are trying to accomplish: They believe in themselves. Confidence is the difference between “I can’t” and “I am unstoppable”. Remember, no one will believe in you if you don’t believe in yourself first. Confidence isn’t just something that happens for most people, it is something that is developed over time.

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  • Meet the Dibabas: The Fastest Family on the Planet

    Ethiopia is a running-mad country—but it’s never seen anything like the Dibabas. Chloe Malle heads to Addis Ababa to meet the fastest family on the planet.

    The only sound at the top of the Entoto Mountains is the thwack of a cowherd’s staff against the tree trunks as he leads his small herd of oxen home. I am doing my best to keep pace with Tirunesh Dibaba, 30, and her younger sister, Genzebe, 25, two wisplike Ethiopians with wide smiles and a fiercely close bond who may be the most formidable female track stars in the world. In the late-afternoon light high above central Addis Ababa, we zigzag between the majestic eucalyptus trees, paying heed to the uneven ground below and staying alert for the not-uncommon hyena sighting—no problem, the sisters assure me, as long as you clap loudly and throw a rock in the animal’s direction.

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