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  • Ethiopia says foiled Eritrea-backed terror attack, kill 15

    Ethiopia authorities said they foiled an Eritrean-backed terrorist attack, killed as well as detained dozens of Eritrean mercenaries. 

    Ethiopian Ministry of Defense said the terrorist attack was thwarted after Ginbot 7, an opposition movement branded by Addis Ababa as terrorist entity attempted to deploy dozens of its armed fighters into Ethiopia.

    The Ginbot 7 forces were arrested trying to infiltrate into Ethiopia from Eritrea via the northern Tigray region bordering Eritrea.

    Military officials on Tuesday told Sudan Tribune that a total of 113 armed members of the banned group have crossed borders into Western Tigray region.

    But most of them were killed or captured by the joint efforts of the residents and regional security forces.

    Out of the total 113 members of the infiltrating forces, 15 were shot dead in fire exchange while 73 were captured; officials said adding security forces are hunting to detain the remaining who went to disarray.

    According to the ministry, several weapons and military equipment were also captured.

    The opposition forces crossed into Ethiopia into two rounds led by Major Mesfin Tigabu and by Destaw Tegegn respectively. Huge number of military weapons, money and other military materials were also captured from the armed men, the Ministry added

    Among others 73 rifles, 62 Hand grenades, other RPG weapons and Satellite communication devices were captured.

    In addition to the weapons and the military equipment, several Ethiopian birr bills and US dollars were seized, the statement indicated.

    The ministry of defense said added that the attempted terrorist plot by Eritrea and the other destructive forces is intended to destabilize and hider development endeavors in the country.

    The captured militants were allegedly trained and armed by the regime in Asmara.

    Ethiopia repeatedly accuses the Red Sea nation of deploying terrorists to destabilize nation, an allegation Eritrea denies.

    Eritrea gained independence from Ethiopia in 1993 after a 30-year guerrilla war however the two neighbors fought a war during 1998-2000 over territorial disputes which killed over 70,000 people.

    As their border dispute never settled the two countries remain at No war – No peace situation. Both countries routinely trade accusations of arming and supporting each others’ rebel groups.

    Ethiopia has often foiled Eritrea-backed attacks and have captured a number of terrorist groups while trying to sneak into the country.

    Previously, Ethiopian forces have penetrated deep into Eritrean territories and attacked several military bases, including those bases used by militants who are given sanctuary by Eritrea to carry out attacks against Ethiopia.

    Source: Sudan Tribune

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  • Why is the Ethiopian diaspora so influential?

    During a year of anti-government protests throughout Ethiopia, its global diaspora, particularly that in the US, has been deeply involved - and not just vocally, writes Addis Ababa-based journalist James Jeffrey.

    Twitter and Facebook have been blocked since a six-month state of emergency was imposed last month as the government tries to restore order across the country's two most populous regions of Oromia and Amhara.

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  • South Africa’s ‘Prophet of Doom’ condemned

    In a Facebook post, self-proclaimed prophet Lethebo Rabalago claims a pesticide called Doom can heal people.

    The company that produces Doom warned of the risks of spraying the substance, while a government commission urged anyone affected to lodge complaints.

    But the pastor has defended his actions, telling the BBC he is using unconventional methods to heal people.

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  • The Weeknd is helping U of T resurrect a lost Ethiopian language

    Giving back: The Weeknd, whose parents emigrated from Ethiopia, donated $50,000 toward the course

    Along with Greek, Hebrew and Arabic, Ethiopia’s Ge’ez is considered one of the world’s oldest Semitic languages—but you’ve probably never heard of it.
    Michael Gervers, a professor in the department of historical and cultural studies at the University of Toronto, believes it’s important to resurrect it. “The entire history of Ethiopia is in this language,” he says. “Everything written up until 1850 was written in Ge’ez, so we have 2,000 years of textual material that people don’t have access to.” It was replaced by Amharic as Ethiopia’s official language.

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